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ISEA2015: The 21st International Symposium on Electronic Art

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Panel [clear filter]
Sunday, August 16
 

11:30am

[Panel 1] Disrupting the City: Using Urban Screens to Remediate Public Space
For over a decade, human-computer interaction (HCI) research placed a great deal of emphasis on studying interaction, engagement, and appropriative practices in online technology-mediated social environments. Moving forward, however, we see computing systems increasingly designed to support digitally-augmented face-to-face interactions in public settings. As far back as the nineteen seventies, new media artists anticipated this interactive potential of digital public displays to foster new forms of situated interactions in urban space, quite distinct from mobile computing in that they altogether exclude online connections or exchanges. Drawing on examples of practice, here, panelists will discuss and showcase some of the key creative strategies that members of the electronic art community from all over the world have deployed in order to remediate interactive screen technology into a platform that disrupts the ordinary ebb and flow of modern city life.

Moderators
avatar for Jean Dubois

Jean Dubois

Artist and Professor, Université du Québec à Montréal
I create installations that, both poetically and critically, tackle interpersonal relationships, combinative textuality and reflexive situations through media interfaces that incorporate the spectator’s body. I teach at Université du Québec à Montréal’s School of Visual... Read More →
avatar for Claude Fortin

Claude Fortin

Doctoral Candidate, Simon Fraser University's School of Interactive Arts & Technology
social smart cities; public interaction with and through technology; immersive installations; digital displays and media façades.

Sunday August 16, 2015 11:30am - 1:00pm
World Art, Room 2515 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

11:30am

[Panel 3] Waves of Technology: The Hidden Ideologies of Cognitive Neuroscience and the future production of the Iconic
This panel will create a picture of, then interrogate the tsunami-like effect of the expanding capabilities of moving-image capture and display and place this within a reading of history that proposes that technology comes upon us insistently like waves upon the beach - and that this situation is of our making for a very specific reason that the panel will explore.

Moderators
avatar for Terry Flaxton

Terry Flaxton

Professor of Cinematography and Lens Based Arts, University West of England
I am Terry Flaxton, director of the Centre for Moving Image Research at the University of the West of England. For thirty years I have been an artist and professional cinematographer (having made my first student film in 1971 and 1st Video in 1976) – in my DoP period I shot for... Read More →
avatar for Leon Gurevitch

Leon Gurevitch

Deputy Head of School, Victoria University of Wellington
I am Deputy Head of the School of Design at at Victoria University of Wellington. I am currently a Royal Society Research Scholar and Senior Lecturer of Photographics and Computational Culture. My research ranges from digital image production and consumption cultures to new media... Read More →
avatar for Charlotte Humpston

Charlotte Humpston

Maker & Producer, Visualfields
Charlotte Humpston is a visual artist experimenting with the interplay between painted surfaces and projected images. She creates artworks that experiment with the materiality of things and their representation in both the real world and the representational world. Her latest artworks... Read More →

Sunday August 16, 2015 11:30am - 1:00pm
Room 4320 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

2:00pm

[Panel 4] Disruption Through Design: Critical Exploits and Spaces of Possibility
The Panel will discuss critical modes of practice that have developed over the past two decades with a focus on whether (and to what extent) they reveal and disrupt surrounding narratives, beliefs or ideologies and/or instigate critical discussion while encouraging more active forms of intervention and agency. If works of critical design such as those of Onkar Kular and CohenVanBalen are created to foster greater collective and democratic participation through a critical practice aimed at social emancipation, we believe that what remains missing in the current context is a critical discourse that addresses if and how these different works meet such lofty goals. Contributors to this panel will provide their own unique perspectives on these issues in an attempt to create the very spaces of possibility for critical discourse. 

Moderators
CB

Craig Badke

Assistant Professor, Emily Carr University of Art and Design

Sunday August 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 4310 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

2:00pm

[Panel 5] Media Design as a Creative Language, the Artist as Meta-Artist
The constant transformation of communication media have been requiring new strategies, new planning methodologies for creative production. In consequence, a whole new concept of creative expression has emerged: the designing and scripting of media-based procedures intended for artistic re-invention, a process called meta-authorship. Following this tendency, those pioneering artists have gradually abandoned traditional functions as individual producers of texts, images and sounds. They can be properly called meta-artists. They have indicated that the rising author has to become a programmer, a designer, an architect of media sys-tems, a composer of media processes, to fully use the potential of new media technologies.

Moderators
Sunday August 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 4270 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

2:00pm

[Panel 6] Analyzing Disruptive Tactics and Strategies in Media Activism
Our 21st century media environment has grown more immersive and predominant with the invention of communication technologies such as telephones, satellites, video cameras, and computers. We are all now electronically connected, able to communicate, observe, and react to what is happening anywhere in the world in an instant. How do we make sense of and trust these myriad electronic messages and their messengers, or even know or understand who or what is behind the code that creates and designs our mediated reality? More importantly, how can we have agency to disrupt and change the mainstream media’s dominant control over most of these messages? This panel will share our knowledge of disruptive media activism by examining its historical origins, current code-controlled aesthetics, and strategies to promote community-based digital storytelling.

Moderators
avatar for Lorna Boschman

Lorna Boschman

Post-doctoral researcher and Project Co-Ordinator, University of British Columbia Cancer's Margins
Lorna Boschman is a leading Canadian new media/video artist whose work has helped to define community engagement within the field of social practice. She has achieved artistic accreditation and has been honoured with many awards (From the Inside/OUT!; (2000) NFB Kathleen Shannon Award... Read More →
avatar for Vicki Moulder

Vicki Moulder

Artist, PhD Candidate, ISEA2015 Performance Chair, Simon Fraser University
Vicki Moulder is an artist and PhD candidate studying at the School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT) at Simon Fraser University in Canada. She holds a Master of Arts from SIAT and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Emily Carr University in visual communications. Molder is a pioneer... Read More →
avatar for Robin Oppenheimer

Robin Oppenheimer

Adjunct Faculty, Cornish College of the Arts
Robin Oppenheimer is a Seattle-based internationally recognized media arts historian, curator and scholar who has worked in the field since 1980. She was Executive Director of two media arts centers in Atlanta (IMAGE Film/Video 1984-89) and Seattle (911 Media Arts 1989-95). She was... Read More →

Sunday August 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:30pm
World Art, Room 2515 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

2:00pm

[Panel 7] Human/Non-Human: Biologies, Ecologies and Subjectivities in New Media Art
This panel will bring together practicing artist whose work focus-es on environmental, ecological and living systems. The practices fall under many names: bio-art, environmental art, ecological art, systems art, are but a few. The focus of human and nonhuman relations however, resonates across these practices. In a time of pending climate catastrophe, this panel seeks to understand the role of art in revealing and understanding our place in the world. What can aesthetic experiences reveal about the ongoing, dynam-ic individuations in the world? How can art disrupt our anthropo-centric tendencies? In this panel, we will explore technological art as a means to understand environmental, biological and ecologi-cal data. The panel participants will discuss their work and indi-vidual approaches to these topics, followed by a panel discussion.

Moderators
avatar for Tyler Fox

Tyler Fox

Studio Director, IMD, University of Washington | Bothell
Tyler Fox is an artist, researcher and educator interested in posthumanism, relational ontology, process philosophy, assemblage, nonhumans, emergence, technology…and more. His work focuses on creating shared experiences between humans and nonhumans. He received his PhD from the... Read More →

Sunday August 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 4320 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)
 
Monday, August 17
 

9:30am

[Panel 12] New Collecting – Curating After New Media Art

This panel invites curators from Vancouver and interna- tionally to share working practices around collecting con- temporary art, including media and new media art. The collections of museums, galleries, online art organisations and private individuals are increasingly broadening to in- clude more new media art.

New media art has both disrupted existing collecting sys- tems and offered now opportunities for rethinking who collects and how. Because new media art is sometimes non-material, process-based or involving audience partici- pation, how might these kind of practices be collected? What is actually collected (objects, beta software, instruc- tions?), where (online, offline, nomadic?) and how (com- missioned for collection, bought from art fairs, versioned from production labs?) Does new media art challenge, or become embedded in, the globalised nature of art markets?

Because new media is used as a means of documenting, archiving and distributing art, and because new media art might be interactive with its audiences, this highlights the new kinds of relationships that might occur between audi- ences as viewers, participants, co-producers, selectors, tag- gers or taxonomisers. Examples of current collecting prac- tice are given by all of the speakers. 


Moderators
avatar for Annet Dekker

Annet Dekker

Arts Professional, University of Amsterdam
Annet Dekker is an independent researcher and curator. She is currently Researcher Digital Preservation at Tate, London, Post-doc Research Fellow at London South Bank University / The Photographers Gallery, and core tutor at Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam (Master Media Design and... Read More →
avatar for Beryl Graham

Beryl Graham

Professor, CRUMB, University of Sunderland
Curating new media art. Beryl Graham is Professor of New Media Art at the University of Sunderland, and is co-founder of CRUMB resource for curators of new media art. She curated the international exhibition Serious Games for the Laing and Barbican art galleries. Her books include... Read More →
avatar for Dene Grigar

Dene Grigar

Director and Professor, WSUV
Dene Grigar is Professor and Director of The Creative Media & Digital Culture Program at Washington State University Vancouver whose research focuses on the creation, curation, preservation, and criticism of Electronic Literature, specifically building multimedial environments and... Read More →

Monday August 17, 2015 9:30am - 11:00am
World Art, Room 2515 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

9:30am

[Panel 8] Poetic Disruption in a Time of Surveillance
This panel explores artistic practices that reappropriate released and “leaked” United States governmental documents. The steady trickle of documents from Edward Snowden’s cache, alongside the mas-sive disclosures from Wikileaks, are only a small part of the regular release of documents via the Freedom of Information Act. This trove of material provides much fodder for artistic investigations into open culture, surveillance, counter-surveillance, drone warfare, and torture, among other topics. Nevertheless, the historical and contemporary artistic approaches discussed will focus more on poetic responses that upset a purely instrumental, objective analysis of the material. The panelists will explore a series of questions around the efficacy of the poetic in a time of objectification and quantification.

Moderators
Monday August 17, 2015 9:30am - 11:00am
Room 4320 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

9:30am

[Panel 9] Objects and Agency: Art, Digital Media, Anthropology
This session draws together the insights produced by SHIVERING, a three year, multi-disciplinary SSHRC funded investigation into the social role of objects, particularly art ob-jects, examined through the facetted lenses of art research, digital and multimedia art practice and contemporary anthropological theory. Building on the work of the British anthropologist, Alfred Gell, who pioneered ideas about art and the apparent animacy and social agency of objects, we have explored ways to expose the social affect of art and museum objects outside of aesthetics, commoditization and colonialist connoisseurship. Bruno Latour suggests devising a variety of specific tricks or artificial situations which ‘make them [objects] talk, that is, to offer descriptions of themselves, to produce scripts of what they are making others – humans and non-humans – do’ (2005:79). We argue that paying attention to the life and agency of art objects creates an oppor-tunity for a theoretically useful critique of modernisms and post-modernisms.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Maria Lantin

Dr. Maria Lantin

Director of the Stereoscopic 3D Centre, Emily Carr University
Maria Lantin is the Director of the Stereoscopic 3D Centre at Emily Carr University of Art + Design. She has a deep interest in space and movement both physical and metaphorical, and this is woven through her work in immersive media and interaction. She takes pleasure in scanning... Read More →

Presenters
avatar for Mimi Gellman

Mimi Gellman

Associate Professor, Emily Carr University of Art and Design
Faculty
avatar for Dr. Maria Lantin

Dr. Maria Lantin

Director of the Stereoscopic 3D Centre, Emily Carr University
Maria Lantin is the Director of the Stereoscopic 3D Centre at Emily Carr University of Art + Design. She has a deep interest in space and movement both physical and metaphorical, and this is woven through her work in immersive media and interaction. She takes pleasure in scanning... Read More →


Monday August 17, 2015 9:30am - 11:00am
Room 4310 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

11:30am

[Panel 10] E/M/D/L - European Mobile Dome Lab for Artistic Research
This panel describes the activities and presents the outcomes of artistic research carried out on the EMDL European Mobile Dome Lab Project, an international collaboration funded by the European Culture Programme (Strand 1.3.5). E / M / D / L has built an international network for the exchange of artistic and technological expertise, with the goal of researching and docu-menting a language and grammar unique to the full-dome medi-um. Bringing together four European and three Canadian institu-tions and cultural partners, all leaders in this field, the project aimed to share and expand skills, methodologies, strategies and content within this promising creative vehicle. Between February 2014 and September 2015, the participants took part in eight resi-dencies and public presentations offered in five countries, where a mobile domic architectural structure equipped with cutting-edge technologies was set up. During these residencies, a series of artistic experiments were conducted for the purpose of investigat-ing certain aspects of the creative potential of the fulldome as a medium. This artistic research activities also led to a series of works which were presented in May 2015 at the world’s most sophisticated virtual theatre, the Satosphere in Montreal, Canada.

Moderators
avatar for Martin Kusch

Martin Kusch

Senior Artist and Artistic Researcher, Dept. Digital Art, University for Applied Arts Vienna, kondition pluriel / Artistic Co-Director
Martin Kusch studied art history, philosophy and painting in Berlin, and media arts with Peter Weibel at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna, where he has also been teaching since 1997. He is the project lead of the fulldome-lab at the Dept. for Digital Art, University of Applied... Read More →
avatar for Mike Phillips

Mike Phillips

Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts, i-DAT
Mike Phillips is Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts at Plymouth University ( School of Arts & Media, Faculty of Arts), the Director of Research at i-DAT.org and a Principal Supervisor for the Planetary Collegium. His R&D orbits a portfolio of projects that explore the ubiquity... Read More →
avatar for Ruth Schnell

Ruth Schnell

Professor and Head of Digital Art Department, University of Applied Arts Vienna
Ruth Schnell lives in Vienna. Her corpus of work, which includes video installations, interactive video environments, and light installations, explores the nature of human perception and the relationship between human perception and the human body. Ruth Schnell has been teaching at... Read More →
VS

Veronika Schnell

senior lecturer, university of Applied Arts Vienna
Veronika Schnell, senior lecturer for media art theory at the Digital Art department of the University of Applied Arts Vienna, head of the educational board for the Digital Art study program, studies in literature, film theory and psychology at the University of Innsbruck (A) ,University... Read More →

Monday August 17, 2015 11:30am - 1:00pm
World Art, Room 2515 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

11:30am

[Panel 11] Disrupting audio-visual paradigms with real-time technology
Technology enables artists increase the complexity of artistic projects, such as when laborious techniques of preparation and production are automated. Animation is an example in which digital technology automates some of the process of production. However, technology has also disrupted the age-old paradigm of production before presentation. An example is the audio-visual performer, who harnesses technology in the pursuit of creating audio-visuals in real-time, fusing the process of design and presentation into the moment of performance. Such an approach has implications for the performer, the audience and the varied experiences that arise. The implications of their practice form the theme of our discussion: issues such as improvisation, controlling multi-media streams and the experience of the audience will form the core conceptual concerns of this panel.

Moderators
avatar for Leon McCarthy

Leon McCarthy

Artist, Lecturer, Researcher, Northumbria & Limerick Universities
Audio-Visual Performance, VJing, Motion-Graphics, Sound Design, App Development, Second-Screening, Audience Research

Presenters
avatar for Leon McCarthy

Leon McCarthy

Artist, Lecturer, Researcher, Northumbria & Limerick Universities
Audio-Visual Performance, VJing, Motion-Graphics, Sound Design, App Development, Second-Screening, Audience Research
avatar for Leonard Paul

Leonard Paul

Director, School of Video Game Audio
Leonard Paul attained his Honours degree in Computer Science at Simon Fraser University in BC, Canada with an Extended Minor in Music concentrating in Electroacoustics. He has a twenty year history in composing, sound design and coding for games and has worked on AAA titles such as... Read More →


Monday August 17, 2015 11:30am - 1:00pm
Room 4320 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

11:30am

[Round Table 3] The Gallery At Play: On the Politics of Exhibiting Game Art
In this round table discussion, curators and practitioners with diverse perspectives on game art and interactive media art explore the historical, cultural, and political stakes of exhibiting interac-tive new media works that incorporate game technology across a spectrum of experimental, institutionalized, and commercial con-texts. In response to digital games’ emergence as a powerful component of contemporary culture, large cultural institutions are beginning to collect, archive and exhibit videogames. The result-ing ‘blockbuster’ initiatives fall in line with established main-stream ludo-industrial narratives, but they do little to explore the roles digital game technology is starting to play in new media art practices. This panel considers the contributions of independent cultural initiatives (exhibitions, festivals, etc.) to this process of exploring game culture and game technologies beyond commer-cial and consumerist contexts. Drawing on their own practices, perspectives, and experiences with art-making and curation, the participants will engage in an open discussion on topics includ-ing: *historical gaming exhibitions; *early avant-garde game modification practices; *the institutionalization of experimental game art; *the rise of the new arcade and ‘indie game’ cultures; *the establishment of the practice of machinima; *the emergence of appropriative practices under the banner of ‘game art,’ and the use of game-like interfaces in new media installations. 

Key Questions Addressed 
• What are the implications of exhibiting games under the larger umbrella of New Media Art? 
• What curatorial methodologies are employed in the field? 
• What are the consequences of the disciplinary siloing that we can observe within game curation? 
• How can critical questions of interdisciplinarity be addressed within the field? 
• How can we unpack the problematic categories of ‘game art’, ‘art games’ and ‘indie games’? 
• How can we create critical historiographical investigations of the roles games occupy within gallery cultures, blockbuster ex-hibitions, festivals and alternative spaces? 
• What future contexts are possible in light of these histories? 

Moderators
avatar for Isabelle Arvers

Isabelle Arvers

Art and games curator, Isabelle Arvers
A graduate of the Political Sciences Institute and a Master in Management of cultural projects, Isabelle Arvers specializes in new media in 1993. Pioneer in the field of game art in France , she curated Playtime – the gaming room of Villette Numérique (2002), as well as the net.art... Read More →
avatar for Skot Deeming

Skot Deeming

Researcher / Doctoral Student, T.A.G Research Centre, Concordia University
mrghosty (aka skot deeming) is an interdisciplinary artist, curator, researcher and doctoral student in Concordia University's Individualized Program in the Humanities. As a new media art and game curator in galleries and the new arcade, as well a researcher at Concordia's TAGlab... Read More →
avatar for Lynn Hughes

Lynn Hughes

Artist Professor, Concordia
Lynn Hughes holds undergraduate degrees in Art and English Literature and a graduate degree in the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, with a concentration in the History and Philosophy of Mathematics. She has taught at universities across Canada and currently holds... Read More →

Monday August 17, 2015 11:30am - 1:00pm
Room 4310 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

2:00pm

[Panel 13] Pain, Art and Communication
In this panel current issues concerning pain, art and communication are addressed. Suggested Speakers are: Ståhl Stenslie, Christa Sommerer & Laurent Mignonneau, Stelarc (to be confirmed), Diane Gromola (to be confirmed), Volker Morawe (to be confirmed) 

In our media society and social networks we are asked to react and communicate permanently. While this can be inspiring and helps us to share, care and heal via networks, such communication can also lead to information overload, exhaustion and chronic bodily pain. In the age of electronic connectivity, how do we now experience pain? And how does it affect us? In this panel we artistically deal with the connection between communication, sensory affects, bodily experiences and artistic experiments exploring these fields.

Moderators
avatar for Diane Gromala

Diane Gromala

Prof. & Canada Research Chair, Simon Fraser University
Diane Gromala is the Canada Research Chair in Computational Technologies for Transforming Pain and a Professor in SFU's (Simon Fraser University's) School of Interactive Arts and Technology. Her research works at the confluence of computer science, media art and design, and is focused... Read More →
avatar for Christa Sommerer

Christa Sommerer

Professor and Head of Interface Cultures Depatment at Art University in Linz Austria/Guest Professor at Aalborg Universi, Unversity of Art in Linz, Austria and Aalborg University, Denmark
Christa Sommerer is an internationally renowned media artist, researcher and pioneer of interactive art. Currently she is a professor and head of the department for Interface Cultures at the University of Art and Design in Linz, Austria. She is also a Obel Guest professor at Aalborg... Read More →
avatar for Ståle Stenslie

Ståle Stenslie

Professor, Stahl
Ståle Stenslie is an artist, curator and researcher in experimental media art. His aesthetic focus is on that what challenges ordinary ways of perceiving the world. Through his practice he asks the questions we tend to avoid – or where the answers lie in the shadows of existence... Read More →

Monday August 17, 2015 2:00pm - 3:30pm
World Art, Room 2515 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

2:00pm

[Round Table 4] The Aesthetics of Erasure
In an era in which state surveillance is capable of capturing, storing, and analyzing all personal communications, and in which even the much-heralded ephemerality of photographic sharing applications such as Snapchat is revealed to be just another instance of deferred, secreted permanence, erasure seems all but impossible. Yet this is precisely what makes erasure a vitally necessary artistic, technological, and social practice. Erasure provides a point of departure from network culture, from the constraints of big data, the archive, and the cloud; through erasure, forgetting and disappearance become radical, profoundly productive and disruptive acts.

This panel seeks to theorize the aesthetics of erasure across various media, platforms, and contexts in the digital era. Bringing together artistic and critical contributors from the forthcoming Spring 2015 issue of Media-N, the journal of the New Media Caucus of the College Art Association, on the special topic of “The Aesthetics of Erasure,” and chaired by the issue’s Guest Co-Editor Paul Benzon, we aim to consider the stakes of erasure for digital art and culture through consideration of a range of questions: What does it mean to consider erasure as an artist’s mark, and how does it reshape the relations between making and unmaking? How do acts of erasure allow artists to harness and resist the possibilities and problems of the archive, of (self-) surveillance, of public and private, and of datafication? What do practices of digital erasure, and the absences they produce, tell us about the materiality of digital activity?

Moderators
avatar for Paul Benzon

Paul Benzon

I teach contemporary literature, media studies, and critical writing at Temple University. In my research, I explore how the material and formal extremities of textual artifacts reveal the cultural history of modern and contemporary media technology. My work has appeared in PMLA... Read More →
avatar for Amaranth Borsuk

Amaranth Borsuk

University of Washington Bothell
Amaranth Borsuk's most recent book is As We Know (Subito, 2014), a collaboration with Andy Fitch. She is the author of Handiwork (Slope Editions, 2012), and, with Brad Bouse, Between Page and Screen (Siglio Press, 2012). Abra, a collaboration with Kate Durbin forthcoming from 1913... Read More →
avatar for Nick Montfort

Nick Montfort

MIT & SfPC
Nick Montfort's computer-generated books of poetry include #!, the collaboration 2×6, Autopia, and The Truelist, the first in the new Using Electricity series from Counterpath. Among his more than fifty digital projects are the collaborations The Deletionist, Sea and Spar Between... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Sweeney

Sarah Sweeney

Associate Professor of Art, Skidmore College
Sarah Sweeney received her BA in Studio Art from Williams College and an MFA in Digital Media from Columbia University School of the Arts and is currently an Associate Professor of Art at Skidmore College. Her digital and interactive work interrogates the relationship between photographic... Read More →

Monday August 17, 2015 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 4310 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)
 
Tuesday, August 18
 

9:30am

[Panel 15] Didactic Disruption: Roy Ascott’s Models for Arts Education and Research

This panel will discuss alternative models of arts education that have emerged from Roy Ascott’s career and practice. Ascott, the founder of the University of Plymouth’s Plane- tary Collegium, is widely regarded for his role as an arts educator and theoretician. In a field that integrates arts, technology and science, he has presented concepts and terminology that frame debates and define new territories. He has published and presented his work internationally, and given keynote addresses at several arts-science con- gresses, including ISEA.

It has been over 20 years since Ascott founded a radi- cal distributed research centre and doctoral program. He founded the Centre for Advanced Inquiry in the Interactive Arts (CAiiA) in 1994 at University College of Wales Newport, and latter established STAR (Science Technolo- gy and Art Research) in the School of Computing at Plym- outh University. CAiiA-STAR constituted a joint research platform, with access to supervisory and technical re- sources at both universities.

In 2003, Ascott relocated the platform to Plymouth University, giving it its present name Planetary Collegium. The Planetary Collegium’s global reach extends beyond the UK through mimetic nodes in Italy, Switzerland and Greece, with a new node currently forming in China. Suc- cessfully graduating over 50 PhDs, the Planetary Collegi- um is host to a dynamic community of over 70 doctoral candidates and researchers.

This panel will discuss the singular aspects of Ascott’s pedagogical challenge to conventional models of advanced art research in Europe and North America. Its panelists will present a history of Ascott’s innovative curricula as well as the development and operation of the Planetary Collegium and its nodes. Finally it will demonstrate how Ascott and the Planetary Collegium have affected advanced studies in the arts beyond the Collegium itself. 


Moderators
avatar for Elif Ayiter

Elif Ayiter

Sabanci University
avatar for Diane Gromala

Diane Gromala

Prof. & Canada Research Chair, Simon Fraser University
Diane Gromala is the Canada Research Chair in Computational Technologies for Transforming Pain and a Professor in SFU's (Simon Fraser University's) School of Interactive Arts and Technology. Her research works at the confluence of computer science, media art and design, and is focused... Read More →
avatar for Mike Phillips

Mike Phillips

Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts, i-DAT
Mike Phillips is Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts at Plymouth University ( School of Arts & Media, Faculty of Arts), the Director of Research at i-DAT.org and a Principal Supervisor for the Planetary Collegium. His R&D orbits a portfolio of projects that explore the ubiquity... Read More →
avatar for Paul Thomas

Paul Thomas

Director of Fine Art, UNSW Art & Design
Dr Paul Thomas, is Associate Professor and Director of the Fine Arts at, UNSW Art and Design. Thomas initiated and is the co-chair of the Transdisciplinary Imaging Conference series 2010, 2012 and 2014. In 2000 Paul instigated and was the founding Director of the Biennale of Electronic... Read More →

Tuesday August 18, 2015 9:30am - 11:00am
Room 4320 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

9:30am

[Panel 16] Curating Lively Objects: Post-disciplinary perspectives on media art exhibition

This panel will examine curatorial practice within a post- disciplinary framework; with a particular focus on the “liveliness” of media art objects and practices that situate themselves across, between and after disciplines. Bringing together curators of new media, as well as scholars work- ing within art/science frameworks the panel will explore the implications of such objects and practices for the future of museums, galleries and other cultural organizations as sites of knowledge production.

Over the past few years the panel conveners, Dr. Lizzie Muller and Dr. Caroline Langill have been conducting re- search around the “liveliness” of media art objects in exhi- bition contexts. This investigation, which has been funded by a SSHRC Insight Development grant, has its roots in theories of media art aesthetics and audience experience, but connects with the increasingly influential discourses of vital materialism and object oriented ontology. The grow- ing acknowledgement of the vitality and agency of things productively disrupts media art theory and curatorial ap- proaches. It challenges the specialness of media arts’ claims around categories such as interactive, responsive, autonomous and generative art. Simultaneously it allows for an expanded field of enquiry and exchange in which media art can escape its exhibitionary ghetto and form pro- ductive and provocative connections with an unlimited world of lively objects.

The panel will present the outcomes of a 3-day curatori- al research workshop, taking place at The Banff Centre in the week prior to ISEA 2015. This workshop, held as part of the Banff International Curatorial Institute program is planned to compliment the ISEA program and to capitalize

Caroline Langill

OCADU Toronto, Canada clangill@ocadu.ca

on ISEA’s international community of media art practi- tioners. The workshop will consider the notion of lively objects - including, but not limited to media art works - and their potential for disrupting the mono-disciplinary struc- tures of the exhibitionary complex. It will examine the agency of such objects within curatorial practice and audi- ence experience, and ask how we might reconsider modes and venues of display in response to this agency.

Sixteen participants will attend the Banff workshop and the following selected presenters will speak about their own work as well as reporting on the dialogue that oc- curred in Banff: 


Moderators
avatar for Lucas Ihlein

Lucas Ihlein

Artist, Lecturer, University of Wollongong
Lucas Ihlein's art projects explore agriculture, social ecology, everyday life, re-enactment, avant-garde cinema history, urban planning, communication and social relations. Lucas is currently working on a project called "Sugar vs the Reef" in collaboration with an 80 year old... Read More →
avatar for Caroline Langill

Caroline Langill

Dean, Liberal Arts and Sciences and the School of Interdisciplinary Studies, OCAD University
My research interests include new materialism, media art histories, and art/science collaborations. Lizzie Muller and I have been looking at objects that exhibit aliveness within the exhibitionary complex, and how these objects might fare in terms of their exhibition, dissemination... Read More →
avatar for Jen Mizuik

Jen Mizuik

Director Visual + Digital Arts, The Banff Centre
Jen Mizuik is the Director of Visual and Digital Arts. She holds over a decade of experience in contemporary art and digital media including creating opportunities for artists to develop new work and build their careers, supporting technological and experimental innovations in artistic... Read More →
LM

Lizzie Muller

Director, Master of Curating and Cultural Leadership, UNSW

Tuesday August 18, 2015 9:30am - 11:00am
Room 4310 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

9:30am

[Panel 17] Digital performance in flesh and bones
This artwork investigates the Brazilian urban body through performance. Unifying concepts of new rhythmic musics and conceptual dance in performance, this painel uses artistic movements in Brazil that are suffering marginalization by breaking with the established aesthetic. Most of them brings a sensual and provocative body with political proposes. Small sketches with images and projections merging graphism with dancing and live music in order to analyze the potential of digital media. Musical matrix connected to traditional rhythms related countryside evolving everyday gestures, repetition with the gradual introduction of electronic music. Musical matrix connected to traditional rhythms related countryside evolving everyday gestures, repetition with the gradual introduction of electronic music in choreography-performance. 
We present a kind of critique of the new mass phenomenon in the Internet that becomes a fever and viral spreads music icons and, through performance and videoart, invite the public to think about society reality and the questions around contemporary music, dance and old paradigms. 

Moderators
AS

Aila Silva

Art Researcher, University of Sao Paulo (USP)

Tuesday August 18, 2015 9:30am - 11:00am
Room 4945 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

2:00pm

[Panel 19] Complexism: Art + Architecture + Biology + Computation, A New Axis in Critical Theory?

Depending on how you look at it, critical theory has been with us for some time. Its contents range from antiquity to the present, from the writings of Parmenides to Zizek, while it is largely a product of postmodernism and the critical turn in the humanities over the last thirty-five years. The new millennium brings with it exhaustion and renewal, global economic collapse coupled with the rapid-fire invention of disruptive technologies, all of which calls for the reevaluation of critical theory in terms of modernity reconceived. Altermodern, paramodern, modernity in the longue durée, or complexism: it is the contemporary time of not simply postmodernity’s past, but more importantly a union of art, architecture, and biology. Of these terms, we choose Philip Galanter’s “complexism” for two reasons. First, as a synthesis of modernism and postmodernism, it takes the best of all worlds. Second, it prioritizes the ecological paradigm of the complex biological system as means to rethink art, architecture, and the humanities broadly conceived.

We propose two panels – both titled COMPLEXISM: Art + Architecture + Biology, A New Axis in Critical Theory? – interrogating the concomitant disruption within critical theory that is the field of art, architecture, and biology. Building on past paradigms, from the Frankfurt School, Post-structuralism, and Deconstruction to embodiment, affectivity, and emergence, these two consecutive workshops unite artists, architects, and theorists to discuss the critical underpinnings of art, architecture, and biology now. Superseding any cultural divisions, each panel will be a mix of artists, architects and theorists. These two panels promise to open a discussion catalyzed by the following questions and more.

  • Ø  How do bio-architecture and bio-art together transform contemporary critical theory?

  • Ø  How does bio-architecture inform bio-art, and vice versa?

  • Ø  What is the role of synthetic biology in helping us to understand “life” as

    it crosses the divide between living and non-living?

  • Ø  How might the naturphilosophie of Goethe carry forth a politics of labor

    justice into the present?

  • Ø  How does Max Bense’s information aesthetics provide a renewed means

    of understanding semiotics in terms of biological complexity?

  • Ø  How does morphogenesis and computation transform the contents and

    definition of “form” within bio-art and bio-architectural practices?

  • Ø  How does Moholy-Nagy’s Bauhaus bio-functionalism inform

    contemporary bio-art, bio-architecture, and critical theory?

  • Ø  Might the biological concept of “autopoesis” approximate “performance”

    and performativity” in the arts?

  • Ø  How does the generative aesthetics of computation resonate with

    generative biology and evolutionary development?

  • Ø  Do bio-art and bio-architecture in the present carry forth the political

    purview of German Romanticism?

  • Ø  What is the role of an aesthetics of complex systems thinking in

    contemporary critical theory?

    Invited panel participants:

  • Philip Beesley, Founder of Philip Beesley Architect Inc. (PBAI) in Toronto,

    Canada and professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo

  • David Benjamin, Principal Architect, The Living and Assistant Professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, New York

  • Juan Manuel Castro, Hideo Iwasaki Lab, Laboratory of Molecular Cell Network & Biomedia Art, Waseda University, Tokyo

  • Dennis Dollens, Visiting Professor, BioDigital Architectures Master, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona. His most recent book is: Autopoietic Architecture: Can Buildings Think?

  • Anna Dumitriu, BioArtist, Author of Trust Me, I’m an Artist: Towards an Ethics of Art

  • Philip Galanter, Artist working in the fields of generative art, physical computing, sound art and music, complexity science, and art theory and Assistant Professor, Department of Visualization, Texas A&M

  • Mitchell Joachim, Co-Founder of Terreform ONE and Associate Professor at NYU and EGS in Switzerland

  • Morgan Meyer, Center for the Sociology of Innovation at Mines ParisTech, Paris, France

  • Patricia Olynyk, Director, Graduate School of Art, Washington University in St. Louis, MO

  • Charissa Terranova, Associate Professor of Aesthetic Studies, University of Texas at Dallas

  • Yvan Tina, PhD Candidate, Arts & Technology, University of Texas at Dallas/Aix Marseille University, France

  • Zenovia Toloudi, Architect, Artist, Assistant Professor of Studio Art at Dartmouth and Elected Member for Boston Society of Architects (BSA) 


Moderators
Presenters
avatar for Anna Dumitriu

Anna Dumitriu

Anna Dumitriu’s work is at the forefront of art and science collaborative practice, with a strong interest in the ethical issues raised by emerging technologies and a focus on microbiology and healthcare. Her installations, interventions and performances use a range of biological... Read More →
avatar for Philip Galanter

Philip Galanter

Associate Professor, Texas A&M University
As Artist - generative art, physical computing, complexity art, evolutionary art, electronic installations, light sculptures, AI-based performing systems, video art, fine art prints. Come see my early ambient video piece at the Disturbance art party at the Vancouver Art Gallery... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Olynyk

Patricia Olynyk

Leonardo/ISAST, NY LASER Co-Host with Ellen K. Levy
Patricia Olynyk is an artist who splits her time between St. Louis and New York. She is Co-director of the NY LASER program in New York with Ellen K. Levy and former Chair of the Leonardo Education and Art Forum. Olynyk directs the Graduate School of Art at Washington University in... Read More →
YT

Yvan Tina

Research Assistant, Aix-Marseille University / UT Dallas
Yvan Tina is a PhD candidate at The University of Aix-Marseille and at The University of Texas at Dallas where he is investigating the possible convergences of artificial life and biotechnologies with the performance arts. He is co-responsible for the multimedia project Virtual Africa... Read More →


Tuesday August 18, 2015 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 4390 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

2:00pm

[Round Table 5] Computational media technology programs in Canada
This panel will explore university programs in Canada that integrate artistic-based and science/engineering-based approaches in holistic ways.

Moderators
avatar for Joanna Berzowska

Joanna Berzowska

Associate Professor and Chair, Concordia University
Joanna Berzowska is the founder and research director of XS Labs, a design research studio with a focus on innovation in the fields of electronic textiles and reactive garments that can enable computationally-mediated interactions with the environment and the individual. A core component... Read More →
avatar for Marek Hatala

Marek Hatala

Professor and Director, Simon Fraser University
Dr. Marek Hatala is a Professor and Director of the School Interactive Arts and Technology at Simon Fraser University. He received his PhD in Artificial Intelligence from the Technical University in Kosice (Slovakia). His research is driven by the problems arising between the computing... Read More →
avatar for Mark-David Hosale

Mark-David Hosale

Associate Professor, York University
Mark-David Hosale is a media artist and composer who holds a Ph.D. in Media Arts and Technology from the University of California, Santa Barbara an MM in Music-Composition and Theory from UIUC, and a BA in Music Composition from the College of Creative Studies, at U.C. Santa Barbara... Read More →

Tuesday August 18, 2015 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 4310 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

4:00pm

[Panel 14] The Visual Politics of Play: On The Signifying Practices of Digital Games
Digital games are so pervasive that they increasingly shape how people ascribe meaning to their world; in short, games are now culture. Similarly to music, literature, television, fashion and film, games as culture constitute "networks of meaningness which individuals and groups use to make sense of and communicate with one another" (Stuart Hall). Games expand the ways that we image our own possibilities, create empathetic connection, and seed ethical engagement with lived-world challenges and problems. Recent games 'culture wars', notably, GamerGate definitively confirmed that games traffic in the politics of representation, just as any other form of mass media. This panel examines the social functions of playable media as powerful forms of visual culture and ideological world making, especially as they relate to notions of difference.

This panel welcomes contributions in critical games research that model intersectional approaches foregrounding the politics of representation, and signifying practices of video games as new media and visual culture. Essays that consider the playability of specific games in relation to their signifying practices are of particular interest. Possible themes may include: representations of race, nation, class; issues of gender/sexuality; games and Diaspora/creolization; close textual analyses using critical studies and/or other disruptive and interdisciplinary approaches.

Moderators
avatar for D. Fox Harrell

D. Fox Harrell

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
D. Fox Harrell, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Digital Media in the Comparative Media Studies Program and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT. He founded and directs the MIT Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory (ICE Lab). Harrell holds... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Jenson

Jennifer Jenson

Professor, York University, Canada
Jennifer Jenson, Ph.D., is Director for the Institute for Research on Digital Learning and Professor of Pedagogy and Technology in the Faculty of Education at York University. She has played, made and researched games for nearly two decades. Specifically, she has taken an intersectional... Read More →
avatar for Soraya Murray

Soraya Murray

Assistant Professor, Film + Digital Media, University of California
New media art, theory, and criticism. Visual culture and cultural studies approaches to art, film, video, and electronic games. Theories of technology and globalization. Representations of otherness including race, nation, class, gender, sexuality.

Tuesday August 18, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 4310 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

4:00pm

[Panel 18] 30+ Years of Artistic Data Visualization: evolution, trends, opportunities
Artistic digital data visualization, as a field, emerged in the 20th century and continues to evolve. The distinguished panelists provide more than 100 collective years of experience in digital data visualization informed by artistic and design principles. Veterans who helped shape the field will share their perspectives on historical evolution and future trends. As panelists provide complementary, and sometimes contradictory views, they will introduce recent projects, identify promising research topics, elucidate funding issues, and collaborative arts opportunities. While there are both openings and closings, data visualization is a vital research area where artists continue to pioneer and collaborate to influence new global cultural directions. These panelists will dynamically engage with each other and the ISEA audience.

Through a dynamic interactive panel format, veteran art- ists, humanists, and scientists will share with and engage ISEA 2015 attendees. Panelists have collectively more than 100 years of lessons learned, wisdom, and bold visions of the future for data-artifacts in the age of digital media.

From complementary perspectives on the emergence and evolution of artistic data visualization, Donna Cox, Sara Diamond, Lyn Bartram, Roger Malina, and Lev Manovich, will provide a glimpse into the past and future of the field, addressing the funding issues, emerging research topics, and collaborative opportunities on the horizon for artists. 

 

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Sara Diamond

Dr. Sara Diamond

President & Vice-Chancellor, OCAD University
Insight: Successful future cities will combine a profound commitment to design and values driven solutions. These must combine qualitative tools that engage and mobilize residents and the many other stakeholders in our urban world, and quantitative methods. Data is a critical resource... Read More →

Tuesday August 18, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
World Art, Room 2515 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)

4:00pm

[Panel 20] Complexism: Art + Architecture + Biology + Computation, A New Axis in Critical Theory?

Depending on how you look at it, critical theory has been with us for some time. Its contents range from antiquity to the present, from the writings of Parmenides to Zizek, while it is largely a product of postmodernism and the critical turn in the humanities over the last thirty-five years. The new millennium brings with it exhaustion and renewal, global economic collapse coupled with the rapid-fire invention of disruptive technologies, all of which calls for the reevaluation of critical theory in terms of modernity reconceived. Altermodern, paramodern, modernity in the longue durée, or complexism: it is the contemporary time of not simply postmodernity’s past, but more importantly a union of art, architecture, and biology. Of these terms, we choose Philip Galanter’s “complexism” for two reasons. First, as a synthesis of modernism and postmodernism, it takes the best of all worlds. Second, it prioritizes the ecological paradigm of the complex biological system as means to rethink art, architecture, and the humanities broadly conceived.

We propose two panels – both titled COMPLEXISM: Art + Architecture + Biology, A New Axis in Critical Theory? – interrogating the concomitant disruption within critical theory that is the field of art, architecture, and biology. Building on past paradigms, from the Frankfurt School, Post-structuralism, and Deconstruction to embodiment, affectivity, and emergence, these two consecutive workshops unite artists, architects, and theorists to discuss the critical underpinnings of art, architecture, and biology now. Superseding any cultural divisions, each panel will be a mix of artists, architects and theorists. These two panels promise to open a discussion catalyzed by the following questions and more.

  • Ø  How do bio-architecture and bio-art together transform contemporary critical theory?

  • Ø  How does bio-architecture inform bio-art, and vice versa?

  • Ø  What is the role of synthetic biology in helping us to understand “life” as

    it crosses the divide between living and non-living?

  • Ø  How might the naturphilosophie of Goethe carry forth a politics of labor

    justice into the present?

  • Ø  How does Max Bense’s information aesthetics provide a renewed means

    of understanding semiotics in terms of biological complexity?

  • Ø  How does morphogenesis and computation transform the contents and

    definition of “form” within bio-art and bio-architectural practices?

  • Ø  How does Moholy-Nagy’s Bauhaus bio-functionalism inform

    contemporary bio-art, bio-architecture, and critical theory?

  • Ø  Might the biological concept of “autopoesis” approximate “performance”

    and performativity” in the arts?

  • Ø  How does the generative aesthetics of computation resonate with

    generative biology and evolutionary development?

  • Ø  Do bio-art and bio-architecture in the present carry forth the political

    purview of German Romanticism?

  • Ø  What is the role of an aesthetics of complex systems thinking in

    contemporary critical theory?

    Invited panel participants:

  • Philip Beesley, Founder of Philip Beesley Architect Inc. (PBAI) in Toronto,

    Canada and professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo

  • David Benjamin, Principal Architect, The Living and Assistant Professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, New York

  • Juan Manuel Castro, Hideo Iwasaki Lab, Laboratory of Molecular Cell Network & Biomedia Art, Waseda University, Tokyo

  • Dennis Dollens, Visiting Professor, BioDigital Architectures Master, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona. His most recent book is: Autopoietic Architecture: Can Buildings Think?

  • Anna Dumitriu, BioArtist, Author of Trust Me, I’m an Artist: Towards an Ethics of Art

  • Philip Galanter, Artist working in the fields of generative art, physical computing, sound art and music, complexity science, and art theory and Assistant Professor, Department of Visualization, Texas A&M

  • Mitchell Joachim, Co-Founder of Terreform ONE and Associate Professor at NYU and EGS in Switzerland

  • Morgan Meyer, Center for the Sociology of Innovation at Mines ParisTech, Paris, France

  • Patricia Olynyk, Director, Graduate School of Art, Washington University in St. Louis, MO

  • Charissa Terranova, Associate Professor of Aesthetic Studies, University of Texas at Dallas

  • Yvan Tina, PhD Candidate, Arts & Technology, University of Texas at Dallas/Aix Marseille University, France

  • Zenovia Toloudi, Architect, Artist, Assistant Professor of Studio Art at Dartmouth and Elected Member for Boston Society of Architects (BSA) 


Moderators
Presenters
avatar for Anna Dumitriu

Anna Dumitriu

Anna Dumitriu’s work is at the forefront of art and science collaborative practice, with a strong interest in the ethical issues raised by emerging technologies and a focus on microbiology and healthcare. Her installations, interventions and performances use a range of biological... Read More →
avatar for Philip Galanter

Philip Galanter

Associate Professor, Texas A&M University
As Artist - generative art, physical computing, complexity art, evolutionary art, electronic installations, light sculptures, AI-based performing systems, video art, fine art prints. Come see my early ambient video piece at the Disturbance art party at the Vancouver Art Gallery... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Olynyk

Patricia Olynyk

Leonardo/ISAST, NY LASER Co-Host with Ellen K. Levy
Patricia Olynyk is an artist who splits her time between St. Louis and New York. She is Co-director of the NY LASER program in New York with Ellen K. Levy and former Chair of the Leonardo Education and Art Forum. Olynyk directs the Graduate School of Art at Washington University in... Read More →
YT

Yvan Tina

Research Assistant, Aix-Marseille University / UT Dallas
Yvan Tina is a PhD candidate at The University of Aix-Marseille and at The University of Texas at Dallas where he is investigating the possible convergences of artificial life and biotechnologies with the performance arts. He is co-responsible for the multimedia project Virtual Africa... Read More →


Tuesday August 18, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 4390 Simon Fraser University (Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4, Canada)